RE/MAX Bell Park Realty



Posted by Loomis Team on 12/4/2017

Having a small outdoor space doesn’t have to put a damper on your enjoyment of certain parts of your home. The outdoors should be a place of peace and serenity, not a place for disdain of your home’s layout! You may even feel that having a small outdoor space will deter you from entertaining guests there. That doesn’t have to be the case, as every outdoor space is useful in one way or another. There are so many ways to make use of any size outdoor space. Even the smallest outdoor spaces have great potential. Here, we’ll break down some of the ways that you can make better use of your outdoor space. These tips may also even enhance the way your outdoor space is currently set up, no matter what its size. Use Drapery or Fabric Certain patios and outdoor spaces allow for objects to be hung. Plants aren’t the only thing that should be hung outside. There’s plenty of options available to you. Using outdoor curtains or a piece of fabric is a classic way to make a space appear larger. The reason for this is that the cloth draws the eye’s attention away from the size of the space, making it appear larger than it actually is. This technique is also useful when it comes to separating part of your outdoor space or creating privacy. If your small space includes a balcony with nosy neighbors, hanging some pretty fabric may be just the solution you need to enjoy the outdoors with some privacy. Hang A Mirror Outside The same principle of hanging a mirror inside the home works outside the home. Mirrors also draw the eye’s attention away from the space itself. This will make any outdoor space feel more open. Mirrors have the same effect as cloth in that they help make rooms and spaces appear larger. Hanging a mirror outdoors is also an “out of the box” idea, so you’ll impress guests when they see this idea put into action. It’s not typical to see mirrors in outdoor spaces, so you’ll seem like a decorating genius. If you have a wall somewhere in your outdoor space, a mirror can be useful there to make your space appear larger than life! Hang String Lights Or Lanterns Outdoor lighting is great for brightening dark corners in both small and large spaces. String lights also fill an otherwise unused space and draw the eyes upwards, creating the sense that the space is larger than it actually is. Outdoor lighting also just makes sense. It makes an outdoor spaces safer for people to enjoy as there’s more visibility. Outdoor lighting is a practical, decorative way to fill a space.





Posted by Loomis Team on 11/27/2017

After you complete a condo inspection, you'll need to make a major decision: Should you move forward with your condo purchase or rescind your offer?

Ultimately, there are several important questions to assess before you finalize your decision on a condo, including:

1. What was discovered during the property inspection?

Study the results of a condo inspection closely. By doing so, you'll be able to learn about a condo's strengths and weaknesses and plan accordingly.

A property inspector will evaluate a condo both inside and out. He or she also will provide honest, unbiased feedback, enabling you to make an informed decision about how to proceed with a condo.

Take into account major and minor condo problems that a property inspector discovers. And if this inspector finds minor flaws associated with a condo, you may want to stay the course and move forward with your initial proposal.

On the other hand, if a property inspector finds significant problems with a condo, i.e. issues that may prove to be costly and time-consuming, you may want to consider rescinding your offer. Or, in this case, you can always ask the condo owner to complete property repairs before you finalize a condo purchase.

2. How much will it cost to perform assorted condo repairs?

The costs associated with condo repairs will vary. However, if you allocate the time and resources to learn about condo problems and the costs associated to fix these issues, you may be able to avoid expensive, time-intensive mistakes.

For example, consider what might happen if a property inspector discovers a defective kitchen light switch in a condo. Although this light switch is a problem, the time and costs needed to repair or replace the faulty light switch likely are minimal. As such, a condo buyer may choose to ignore this problem, or a condo owner may be willing to complete the fix quickly.

Conversely, consider what could happen if a property inspector finds that a condo's furnace is defective. It may cost thousands of dollars to fix or replace a faulty furnace. As a result, a condo buyer may ask the property seller to repair or replace the defective furnace. And if the condo owner fails to do so, a buyer may choose to walk away from the condo purchase altogether.

3. Can I enjoy this condo both now and in the future?

It is essential to consider both the short- and long-term ramifications of a condo purchase. That way, a condo buyer can determine whether a property can serve him or her well for years to come.

A property inspection offers valuable information that a buyer can use to assess the pros and cons of purchasing a condo. Furthermore, a condo buyer who works with an experienced real estate agent can get the support needed to make the best decision possible.

Consider the aforementioned questions as you evaluate your options following a condo inspection, and you should have no trouble deciding whether a particular condo is right for you.




Tags: Condo   buyer tips   Buying a home  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Loomis Team on 11/20/2017

Home automation or smart-home technology is just one piece of the bigger picture that is known as the “Internet of Things.” What this term basically means is that as technologies evolve they are becoming more ingrained into everyday objects.

 What was once designated just for personal computers and cell phones is now the domain of any number of everyday objects--from our cars to our refrigerators. This means we can control things remotely, monitor our houses and our belongings, and even see if our babies are sleeping soundly from work via the latest baby monitors.

 One of the most recent implementations of these technologies is in our home security systems. Home automation and security are natural companions, give us an ever-increasing number of ways to guarantee our safety within our homes.

 In today’s article, we’re going to talk about the objects in our home that can be connected to the internet and how you can improve security at home.  

Security or security risk?

Critics of the internet of things often bring up one chief concern--data security. The more objects we connect to the internet the more ways we open our data up to being compromised. To make matters worse, many electronics manufacturers aren’t concerned with the security of the devices they make, giving them no safeguards or encryption against being hacked.

In fact, these objects have already been commandeered by hackers, but not in the way you might think.

A common way to attack a website or service is to simply flood it with more traffic than it can handle. Since WiFi enabled refrigerators, webcams, and baby monitors tend to provide little protection, hackers have found ways to install malware on them that allow them to send all of these devices to a given site in an orchestrated incident known as a DDoS attack (Distributed Denial of Service). All the while your refrigerator seems to be working normally, but behind the scenes it’s part of a “zombie” army of devices.

What items can connect to the internet?

The number of objects that come equipped with WiFi capability grows every day. Some are extremely useful. They can let you know when you’re out of paper towels or laundry detergent, they can tell you if you forgot to lock the doors or turn out the lights, or you can ask them to play your favorite playlist.

However, just because an item can connect to your WiFi doesn’t mean you should let it by default. You’ll need to consider the pros and cons.

Which items can I trust?

Unfortunately for consumers, there is no “safe to use” list when it comes to the gadgets you might have around your home. But, that doesn’t mean you can’t do your research on the items yourself to look for basic security measures.

First, check to see if the items are password-protected or use some form of authentication. You can often find this information on the manufacturer’s website or in the user guide.

Next, think about who makes the product. Reputable companies like Apple, Google, and Amazon all have a lot invested in the security of their customers. As a result, Google Home, and Apple’s HomePod are likely to have stronger security measures in place.

Finally, you’ll have to take a look at your own security habits. Changing passwords frequently, creating complicated passwords, and being careful with your information online are all ways you can help prevent your data or identity from being compromised.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Loomis Team on 11/13/2017

For home sellers, it may be easy to fall into the trap of overpricing your property. And if you're not careful, you may encounter a number of price-related problems, including:

1. Homebuyers will shy away from your house.?

Homebuyers want to find high-quality and affordable residences that they can enjoy for years to come. However, if you overprice your house, you risk alienating large groups of homebuyers instantly.

Price represents a key factor for homebuyers, and as such, you'll want to offer a price that matches homebuyers' expectations and budgets. If you assess the real estate market closely, you should have no trouble establishing a fair price for your home.

For example, home sellers can compare and contrast their houses with residences that currently are listed on the housing market. By doing so, home sellers can evaluate the prices of comparable houses and set prices for their houses based on the current real estate market's conditions.

2. Your home may remain on the real estate market for an extended period of time.

Overpriced homes frequently take longer to sell than other residences. This means your house may linger on the real estate market for months, weeks or years if you fail to price it appropriately.

When it comes to pricing your home, you'll want to make a great first impression on homebuyers. Ultimately, if you establish a fair price from the get-go, you can accelerate the home selling process.

It also is important to note that homebuyers frequently can sense desperation. And the longer your home remains on the market, the more likely it becomes that a homebuyer may assume that a home seller is desperate to get rid of a property. Thus, you might wind up receiving offers far below your initial expectations if you overprice your house.

On the other hand, if you price your house aggressively, you can boost your chances of generating plenty of interest in your residence and receiving multiple offers that meet or exceed your expectations.

3. Your home will be difficult to promote.

There are many great features that help you home stand apart from others. Conversely, an above-average price will hurt your chances to differentiate your home in any real estate market and detract from your real estate agent's ability to promote your house.

For home sellers, it is crucial to listen to your real estate agent. This professional understands what it takes to promote a house and will be able to offer pricing recommendations based on the current housing market. Furthermore, your real estate agent has your best interests in mind and will do everything possible to help you optimize the value of your house.

Work with an experienced real estate agent to ensure you can determine the ideal price for your home – you'll be glad you did. With a real estate agent at your side, you can set a fair price for your residence and move one step closer to selling your residence.





Posted by Loomis Team on 11/6/2017

To get top dollar for your home, consider inking a deal with a real estate agent. Real estate agents, especially agents who have been selling homes for several years,are well versed in realtor and lender jargon. They know how to negotiate competitive rates with lenders. Relationships that they have with area real estate agents prevents them from getting hoodwinked.

Pocket bigger profits when you sell your home

But, real estate agents aren't free. Neither are they cheap. Typical commissions that real estate agents charge range from five to six percent of the total price of the house sell. Services included in the commissions depend on agreements that you make with your agent. As an example, a real estate agent might include the costs of house staging, attending open houses and prime real estate listings in their fees.

Your profits depend on what an agent is able to sell your home for. To get more money for your home, real estate agents:

  • Hire inspectors to walk through your house and spot wiring, roofing, flooring and drainage issues. Real estate agents also reach out to contractors, realtors and repair workers to perform upgrades on your home.
  • Research the market and understand competitive housing prices in the regions that they work in. To get you more money for your home, real estate agents also know what the best seasons to get top dollar fora house are.
  • Negotiate closing costs, encouraging buyers to pick up most, if not all, of the closing costs. Real estate agents may also negotiate to have buyers pick up the costs of unforeseen repairs. This may bed one by marketing that sellers are willing to leave one or more appliances in the home. The gain in this instance would come if sellers already planned to get brand new appliances.
  • Educate homeowners on how they can use personal memories and their house's history to build interest in their house. A story goes a long way. Real estate agents know that if sellers make a deep enough personal connection with buyers, the price that buyers are willing to pay for the house could increase.
  • Prepare homeowners for the house staging process. Top real estate agents know interior designers and home stagers. They know how much to spend on staging, when to stage and how much to add to the home.
  • Market open houses. In addition to posting"open house" signs near the home, real estate agents list houses in relevant online and print local and regional lifestyle, investment and realty publications and directories.
  • Take photos and videos of the interior and exterior of your home.
  • Create attention grabbing write ups on your house.

Real estate agents use SEO tactics, real estate websites and emails to generate leads. They use social media, door signs, newsletters and paid ads to generate interest in your house. To get more money for your home, real estate agents also tap into their realtor networks.







Tags